The atlantic world essays on slavery migration and imagination


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Gareth Knapman. Home Contact us Help Free delivery worldwide. Free delivery worldwide. Bestselling Series. Harry Potter. Popular Features. New Releases. Description The Atlantic World: Essays on Slavery, Migration, and Imagination brings together ten original essays that explore the many connections between the Old and New Worlds in the early modern period. Divided into five sets of paired essays, it examines the role of specific port cities in Atlantic history, aspects of European migration, the African dimension, and the ways in which the Atlantic world has been imagined.

This second edition has been updated and expanded to contain two new chapters on revolutions and abolition, which discuss the ways in which two of the main pillars of the Atlantic world-empire and slavery-met their end. Both essays underscore the importance of the Caribbean in the profound transformation of the Atlantic world in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. This edition also includes a revised introduction that incorporates recent literature, providing students with references to the key historiographical debates, and pointers of where the field is moving to inspire their own research.

Supported further by a range of maps and illustrations, The Atlantic World: Essays on Slavery, Migration, and Imagination is the ideal book for students of Atlantic History. A Unknown. More options.

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Find it at other libraries via WorldCat Limited preview. Contributor Klooster, Wim. Padula, Alfred. Bibliography Includes bibliographical references p.

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Whose Centers and Peripheries? This original text brings together four pairs of essays that examine the themes of slavery, migration, and imagination in the Atlantic World from Offering all the advantages of an Atlantic approach, it explores major historical topics and the manifold connections between the Old World and the New in the early modern period.

Bibliographic information. Publication date ISBN Colonization of Hispaniola resulted in a complete loss of indigenous land control on the island by the introduction of Old World pathogens reduced the Taino population to one-half of one percent of its original. Scott, Eds. The population of gens de couleur libres, free people of color comprised of a small number of freed blacks with a mixed-race majority manumitted by a white parent, was comparable at 28, The unfree black population dwarfed both at , of whom two thirds were African immigrants rather than native-born creoles.

Egerton, et. The Atlantic slave trade was the source of the mass migration that characterized the Atlantic World and its primary mechanism for exploitation of American land and African slave labor. Immediate abolition of the trade followed the success of the insurrection and the number of slaves that disembarked in Saint Domingue precipitously fell from a five-year peak of , between and , to 40, from , and to statistically zero thereafter. The American and French Revolutions of and promoted notions of freedom, equality and the rights of man across an Atlantic World predicated on inequality and rights of conquest.


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In Saint Domingue, the colored elites and semi-elites successfully applied these already revolutionary notions in an exponentially more radical way. Prior to the mass slave insurrection of in Saint Domingue, whites primarily based their awareness of the Black Atlantic as a population that had its place in the Atlantic World and had neither the desire nor capacity to change the status quo.

While whites took precautions against and worried over individual slave resistance or the potential for local plots of rebellion, they did not imagine the possibility of an organized, widespread slave insurrection that would lead to creation of a new nation with power consolidated in the hands of blacks. Likely most people of color in the Black Atlantic agreed that the Atlantic World social hierarchy was firmly entrenched. Despite Enlightenment rhetoric on the rights of man, and the American and French Revolutions inspired by it in and , even the most liberal white minds of the time never intended them to immediately or ever apply to all people of color.

In the absence of an enslaved intelligentsia, the political and philosophical tenets of the Haitian Revolution developed on the fly instead of through years of ongoing multicontinental public discourse. First, the initial insurrection began with blacks attacking, killing, and burning on an unprecedented scale.

The Atlantic World Essays on Slavery Migration and Imagination 9781138285989

That elite slaves, coachmen, domestics and other trusted blacks thought well integrated into Atlantic World society planned the insurrection added to the fear as whites now viewed the entire mass of the Black Atlantic as a hostile and dangerous force. Additionally, due to the large number of African-born slaves in Saint Domingue, witnesses to the violence reported distinctly African battle features. Preparations involved African religious rituals, incantations, and sorcery, while African rhythms on drums accompanied marches, formations, and attacks carried out during bloody incursions.

For whites, it was a terrifying war with foreign invaders, despite the fact that the slaves involved already lived in Saint Domingue. Thirteen years later after Dessalines declared Haitian independence on January 1, the Haitian populace organized massacres of the remaining whites as revenge for the past and a warning for the future.

Dessalines declared the slaughter an act of national unification between 56 Ibid. For Atlantic World whites, the Black Atlantic via the Haitian Revolution defied their universal beliefs of social hierarchy, executed a successful race war, and became a terrible vehicle for the disintegration of the Atlantic World.

Transplanted slaves from Saint Domingue and others influenced by the revolution spread insurrectionist ideology linked to rebellions throughout the Atlantic World. The slave insurrections that occurred in the four decades after the Haitian Revolution were the largest and most notorious in the Atlantic World, including those in Curacao in , Louisiana in , Barbados in , and the Denmark Vesey affair in Charleston. Laurent Dubois and Julies S. David P. Latin American revolutionary leaders conscripted slaves to fight in exchange for freedom, and weak as it was, the Haitian military aided others seeking freedom in the Americas.

After the Haitian Revolution, the Black Atlantic rallied to its own cause in a way it had not previously. Preliminary research indicates that from through , creolization in Saint Domingue proceeded in the same manner as in most locations in the Americas. Contact and creolization occurred in Africa, on slave ships, and in the colony. But the Atlantic slave trade acted as the primary vehicle by which Africans migrated to Saint Domingue and with the abolition of the slave trade, no new infusions of culture directly from Africa occurred.

Standards of the slave regime no longer applied. Even the authority of the Catholic Church evaporated during the Great Haitian Schism of during which the violence in Saint Domingue caused priests to flee or to be killed or expelled, leaving no official Church administration in place.


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  6. This period marked a distinct divergence in the development of Haitian Vodou from both its African indigenous antecedents and from Voodoo in New Orleans, which continued to develop within the larger Atlantic World. Integration occurred via three primary mechanisms: 1 European exploitation of America and Africa, 2 Creolization, and 3 The psychological manifestation of a Black Atlantic.

    Although integration peaked just before the turn of the nineteenth century, the Atlantic World began a transformative period associated with the American, French, and Haitian revolutions. In the century after , changes to the key structures supporting the Atlantic World weakened integration and destabilized the Atlantic World, transforming it markedly. Colonization and migration continued in the Americas, but Africa increasingly became the primary focus of European imperial ambitions. Increasing wars of independence, abolition, and emancipation destabilized then undermined the economy of the Atlantic World based on triangular trade.

    By the mid-nineteenth century integration had weakened dramatically and left behind a transformed Atlantic World that was economically, socially, and politically different from its former self. Geggus, Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, Allen, Carolyn. Konversations in Kreole. Andrien, Kenneth J. Greene, New York: Oxford University Press, Appiah, Kwame Anthony.

    Armitage, David. Braddick, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, Roberts, Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, Bailyn, Bernard. Atlantic History: Contours and Concepts. Bernard Bailyn, Baron, Robert. Bastide, Roger. Bellegarde-Smith, Patrick. Haiti: The Breached Citadel. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, Benjamin, Thomas, Timothy D. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, Benton, Lauren and Benjamin Straumann.

    Blackburn, Robin. The Overthrow of Colonial Slavery, London: Verso, Braithwaite, Edward Kamau. Braudel, Fernand. Paris: A. Buckner, Timothy R. Nicholas Canny and Philip Morgan, Bushnell, Amy Turner. Campbell, Gwyn. Gwyn Campbell, vii-xxxi.

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